The Race to Recycle The Future

We’re told the car of the future will be electric and stufed with lightweight composites, but how green can it be if it can’t be recycled? By Jake Groves

ELECTRIFIED, MADE USING innovative materials and almost certainly autonomous: three interlinked future-car themes that car makers repeatedly tell us are The Next Big Things. Volvo, for example, has famously promised that all of its future new cars will offer an electrified derivative from 2019, while VW is planning to sell three million electric vehicles annually by 2025, and BMW’s i3 and i8 blazed the trail for the use of stiff but light composites in EVs, to help offset heavy batteries.

EU transport commissioner Violeta Bulc sees innovative car tech helping less able people become mobile again

AS HUMANS we make our decisions in relation to freedom. Mobility helps us address this need for freedom – boats and horses in the beginning, more sophisticated solutions in the 21st century.

> WHEN CARS became widespread, they have shaped our world, given us freedom of movement and expression.

does it work? Mercedes’ New Voice Control

THE WAY IN WHICH you op- erate a Mercedes has changed radically. Gone is that familiar rotary controller, used to click on lists at the edges of the infotainment screen. In its place, after four years of re- search with partner Samsung-Harman, comes MBUX – the Mercedes-Benz User Experience – which is operated in four different ways: touchscreen, steer- ing wheel pads, touchpad (sited where the rotary controller used to be) and the big one: voice control.

Driving The Next Focus RS’s Hybrid Four-Wheel Drive

Petrol and electric power work in harmony in a system set to take Ford’s hot hatch to another level. By Ian Adcock

THINK HYBRID as in Porsche 919 Hybrid Evo, not hybrid as in Toyota Prius. The merging of electric and internal combustion motors can be focused on economy or performance, or a bit of both. The new hybrid system we’ve tested – and which we expect to be used in 2020’s Ford Focus RS – is very much about performance.

The liquid-cooled engine in Porsche’s new 911 GT3 RS makes 513bhp and revs to 9000rpm. How the hell does this old air-cooled flat-six all but match it? Witchcraft! By Ben Miller

The liquid-cooled engine in Porsche’s new 911 GT3 RS makes 513bhp and revs to 9000rpm. How the hell does this old air-cooled flat-six all but match it? Witchcraft! By Ben Miller

IT CAN’T HAVE figured much in Porsche’s thinking: that when it went liquid-cooled with the 996-generation 911’s flat-six, the goal would be left wide open for the air-cooled engine’s ongoing evolution. Porsche had no choice but to move on, and did so convincingly. But great engines refuse to die, and in the hands of Californian restoration specialist Singer Vehicle Design, the air-cooled 911 engine has undergone an aston- ishing evolutionary leap.

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